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June 01 2015

thatsridicarus
4522 9838 500

skaletal:

 rainbow-ginger-butterfly:

wholetjackdrive:

queerart-civildisobedience:

European accents (and in general white people accents) are commonly perceived as attractive and endearing, while accents from basically any other part of the world are considered to be signs of laziness and disrespect and get routinely made fun of.

My whole family is Korean. My sister and I have grown up in the US so we can pretty much speak English. However, our parents speak very broken English. It makes me mad though because my mother has taken ESL classes at our local university and my father graduated from the University of Washington with a PhD in mechanical engineering, yet I constantly see them being made fun of by their coworkers or other people in general because “they’re too lazy to try to understand English.” My mom has spent countless nights crying whilst taking her classes because of the stress wishing she could speak half as fluently as I can. If you don’t know what it’s like trying to learn English as a second language, then you have no room to talk.

NEVER MAKE FUN OF SOMEONE WHO SPEAKS BROKEN ENGLISH. IT MEANS THEY SPEAK ONE MORE LANGUAGE THAN YOU DO. 

As someone who’s been trained to teach English to non-English speakers, allow me to inform you that English is an eldritch Frankenstein-esque abomination of borrowed words and mismatched grammatical rules.

Structurally, English is as convoluted and obtuse as any aspect of governmental bureaucracy, and it’s similarly societally entrenched in a way that makes people believe, and even insist, that’s just “the way of things.”

Here’s the facts: English is fucking hard. English doesn’t make logical sense. English is weird and horrible and inconsistent and makes common use of unusual phonemes that most adult speakers of other languages have to be mechanically taught to differentiate from similar sounds that are distinct in the English language. Without mechanical introduction and proper instruction, a lot of people cannot actually hear the difference in sounds you are mocking them for.

In some languages, [p] and [b] are indistinguishable. This is why you heard that gentleman say he would like a “can of Coke or Bebsi” with his order. It has nothing to do with laziness.

In some languages, [l] and [r] are indistinguishable. This is why you’re an asshole for going “me rikey” like the substitution is somehow comical. You’re a dick, and also most likely racist.

In the vast majority of languages, [θ] and [ð], known to English speakers as the voiceless (thing) and voiced (there) versions of the th sound, respectively, straight up does not even exist. This is why she says “teef” or “toofbrush,” why he keeps saying “ze” or “de” in place of “the,” and why they said “sank you very much” when you held open the door for them. 

There are sounds in English that a hell of a lot of speakers of other languages cannot teach themselves to recognize and recreate without assistance.

And, y’know, even if you get the screwy grammar and troublesome pronounciation down, English is a language in which very slight changes in intonation and word stress can completely change the meaning of a sentence. 

Like so:

But how are you doing? (Flamboyant pleasure to see someone, eagerness to catch up.)

But how are you doing? (Deflection from inquiries about self, moving conversation in a new direction.)

But how are you doing? (Concern, request for further or more accurate information.)

These are all totally different statements.

It’s incredibly easy to come across in a way you did not want or intend to when you’re not familiar with the particular ways in which saying something can change what it means to other people. 

Don’t you ever give people shit for not achieving or approaching fluency in English.

Repeat after me: English is a terrible fucking language and speaking it does not make me tangibly superior to anyone else in literally any way.

Reposted bymatusscomicsmanxxaeriskasessitaofbitchesandbutterfliesnatexschaafSirenensangakmonidesn0gasiekxpnaichyouamfrogaholicMissDeWordemyinspiration

May 25 2015

thatsridicarus
6811 f233 500

demcatwhiskerstho:

Racism in brunei

teeaah:

YO, this is disgusting as fuck. As a Muslim, I was taught to fight for justice for everybody and to protect every person from any form of oppression regardless of their religion, ability, or gender. I was never told—in my reading of religious text—to only save Muslims. Islam has taught me kindness and cooperation with others. It has taught me peace not just with myself, but with others. Islam never taught people that democracy is wrong or elections is not a part of Islamic political system. Islam never taught people that political representation should only be from Muslims. Whoever has been telling you that is feeding you lies and would rather numb you than allow you to participate because being Muslim means being actively engaged.

What the person on the picture is saying that their values is one that is spineless and lazy, and that the status quo is benefiting them the most; hence, speaking for it with the blind eye is the right thing to do—because the government rubbed my back, so you should rub the government’s penis back, right?

Also, Malay-Muslims are not first class citizens in Brunei. They are second class citizens too. Everyone is second class.

demcatwhiskerstho:

Exactly ! Even my muslim friends said that but most of the elder generations here are fucked up. The elder generations actually WANT to stone the gays and think that the other religions should get out of brunei. There was one comment that said “chinese people should shut up and accept the syariah law or else they’ll kidnap the chinese minister in Brunei and burn him.” LIKE WHAT. I even had a teacher that told me to keep my mouth shut if I didn’t agree with Brunei and to just get out of Brunei and return back to China. Cause I’m chinese. I’M A CITIZEN TO BRUNEI. I’ve never even been to China. I just hope that the next generation, my generation, will be better than the last :(. So far my friends are really awesome they’re really nice and understanding. :)

blueplaidpants:

I remember my deeply visceral response–literally feeling like throwing up–when I first came across posts like these on various Facebook pages. I have since then developed a somewhat tougher exterior against such personalized prejudice, but only because I had to. The truth is the hurt that arises from this kind of hatred is always fresh and always potent–and I suspect this will be the case for the longest time–so if I had not will myself against the barrage (yes, barrage) of hateful viewpoints, I would be crushed long ago.

In retrospect, my nausea at my first-ever-seen clearly-articulated written statement of my status as beneath my Malay brothers and sisters is silly in a sense. The thing is: I have always known. I have been raised up to believe I am indeed a second-class citizen, and to accept this fact, and nobody even had to say a word about this to me. It was clear from my process of growing up, from my day-to-day routines and interactions, from all my life, that I, for one reason or the other, simply have less rights than the Malay everyman/woman. Legislated rights and rights beyond the scope of law both.

I have learned that more people than I had ever imagined harbor ideas like those pictured above. Social media is amazing and devastating in this regard. Common extension of the discrimination: “If you don’t like it here, leave.” If I have days, I could point out the logical flaws and practical stupidity of the ideas pictured above or the rather ubiquitous demand for unhappy non-Malays to leave the country. I do not have days however, and will only point out that even more worrying than the lack of rationality among certain Bruneians is the lack of empathy and kindness and humanity. I pray for our survival.

Also racism and bad grammar go well together
Reposted bymolotovcupcake molotovcupcake

May 24 2015

thatsridicarus
0966 5dbb 500

masturbatorsanctum:

bloketoys:

commanderabutt:

Just a reminder that the LGBT community isn’t some magical place where everyone is accepted. 

Because life is all “me, me, me!!!!” for these people.

It’s sad to see so many in the so-called “LGBT community” being so shallow and judgmental. It’s almost like a racist being a pig and then someone pointing out their Asian friend and them saying “Yeah, but they’re different, I know them!”

As a followup to last week’s comments about homophobia, and as a reminder that phobias are not exclusive to a certain subgroup (say, heteros). Reading the tweets above is comically sad. Replace “bi” with “gay”, and see that the rhetoric is exactly the same.

This does not excuse the rhetoric of homophobes though. Rather, this is a reminder that no one is blameless. We all need to work to get rid of our stereotypes and prejudices. Racism, sexism and all types of segregations are not unidirectional phenomenons. 

Reposted bymolotovcupcakeJamesEvansnaichjabolmaxschottladenspinatlasagne

November 26 2014

thatsridicarus
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